From: Shelley Velleman <velleman@comdis.umass.edu>

Date: January 28, 2006 5:53:57 PM EST


http://accent.gmu.edu/:  Samples of speakers of many dialects and first languages, all reading the same English text, 69 words long.

http://polyglot.lss.wisc.edu/dare/dare.html   DARE excerpts: Arthur the Young Rat and spontaneous speech


http://www.pbs.org/speak/seatosea/americanvarieties/DARE/# -- small # of longer spontaneous speech samples from DARE

http://www.ic.arizona.edu/%7Elsp/index.html  Some varieties have samples; not all

 

http://www.otago.ac.nz/anthropology/Linguistic/Sounds/Sounds4.html  New Zealand, Australia, "England", "American"; all reading the same passage, 3-4 sentences long.

 

http://www.fonetiks.org/  "American", various UK, other languages

 

http://www.uga.edu/lsava/Topics/Language%20Variation/Language%20Variation.html:  videos of Ocracoke, Lumbee; discussion of Spanglish and verb tenses

 

http://www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/AmDialLnx.html


http://accent.gmu.edu/browse_maps/namerica.php


Other links are possible from Karen Chung's homepage, under 'accents'  http://ccms.ntu.edu.tw/~karchung/linguistics%20links.htm


Also, try the links from the American Dialect Society  www.americandialect.org


Bill Labov has just published a beautiful Atlas of American English, with CD.  It is expensive, but see if your library will buy it from Mouton    http://web.uni-marburg.de/linguistik//dgweb/atlas/


Also, have a look at the MLA's wonderful, interactive color maps of languages in America.   You can type in zip codes and get user-friendly but detailed language breakdowns based on census data of the 30 most commonly spoken languages in the US.  www.mla.org